Retail design trends

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BatteryMill
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Retail design trends

Post by BatteryMill »

Here's just a thread to discuss what's going on in the world of retail architecture as of late.

At present, most retailers seem to be going for a flashy, modern and minimalistic look for their stores. Additionally, neutral grayscale colors and wood-panel designs are popular within these decor packages, even on exteriors. In my opinion, these can look appetizing when done right, but there are some examples of these that just appear too bright (with LEDs) or uninspired compared to older packages.

With that being said, anyone notice that traditional, market-style packages (such as the Harris Teeter's 2000s look) have fallen quite out of favor? There aren't too many retailers that opt for a more friendly, down-to-earth design in their stores at this time.

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Re: Retail design trends

Post by retailfanmitchell019 »

Then there was the whole "earth tones" trend done in the late 90's/2000's, inspired by Whole Foods or Wild Oats. Albertsons did this with their "Blue & Green Awnings" decor.
Acme "Chalkboard Market":
Albertsons "Industrial Circus":
Jewel "Marketplace":
Albertsons "Wegmans Wannabe":
Safeway "Pre-Lifestyle":
Kroger "Fresh Fare":

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Re: Retail design trends

Post by Alpha8472 »

Macy's in Concord, California is undergoing a remodel. The walls are stark white and the carpet is light blue or gray. It is very bland looking.

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Re: Retail design trends

Post by Super S »

I would like to see the trend of polished concrete floors go away. This really only works for new builds. A lot of the conversions in older stores really look bad.

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Re: Retail design trends

Post by TW-Upstate NY »

Super S wrote: September 11th, 2020, 5:46 pm I would like to see the trend of polished concrete floors go away.
Thank you! And add to that open ceilings as well.

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Re: Retail design trends

Post by storewanderer »

I hate the cement floors. I like open ceilings with skylights though. I don't like open ceilings without skylights much especially with exposed fiberglass.

Once in a while I come across a new build store with cement floors that I think actually look good. But even on some new stores it looks lousy and downscale.

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Re: Retail design trends

Post by storewanderer »

Alpha8472 wrote: September 10th, 2020, 11:25 pm Macy's in Concord, California is undergoing a remodel. The walls are stark white and the carpet is light blue or gray. It is very bland looking.
That probably means that is a strong performing Macy's as they are supposedly investing significant money in about 200 top performing stores to bring them to the next level.

In Reno Macy's has put this gray carpet into the clothing rack areas but has kept a scratched up 1978 era tan/light wood colored floor throughout the central walkways on the second floor of the woman's Macys. This clashes badly. In the Backstage they didn't replace the carpet and it still has some of the old red carpet from the 80's (this area used to be the kid's department).

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Re: Retail design trends

Post by Alpha8472 »

The Macy's remodeled over 10 years ago with concrete floors in one section. It looked so bad that they ended up turning that area into the Women's Back Stage area. The area looked permanently like it was unfinished and under renovation. I do not know if they will add tile to finish it.

Target attempted polished concrete floors during last year's remodel of the Target store in Walnut Creek, California. The floor is a flexible suspended floor over the parking garage below the store. You can feel the floor bounce when heavy cars drive through the garage below. The floor had so many cracks that Target abandoned the concrete floor and hastily installed white tiles throughout the store.

The Target in nearby Dublin, California is being remodeled and they are using white tile as well. Target realized that concrete floors look really bad and will use tile from now on.

However, I do not know if Target will add the disco Target Cafe room with the color changing lights to the Dublin store. That room is enough to give people seizures. Target also added an Optical store inside.

The Macy's in Walnut Creek, California was remodeled a few years ago adding new windows which let in natural light. It really brightened the store and made it look totally different. That store also added a Starbucks cafe inside with a full seating area.

Macy's also added Lenscrafters inside a couple of years ago.
Last edited by Alpha8472 on September 13th, 2020, 9:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Retail design trends

Post by veteran+ »

I love NEW polished concrete floors or slightly distressed (not dirty looking with huge scars) coupled with exposed ceilings (but darker colored).

I do not always think that works for upper scale large department stores.

The Rockn Roll Ralphs on Sunset Bl. has the ugliest concrete floors I have seen. They really look dirty even when clean.

I think (at least in SoCal) supermarket architecture has become so banal and uninspiring.

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Re: Retail design trends

Post by BatteryMill »

retailfanmitchell019 wrote: September 10th, 2020, 7:22 pm Then there was the whole "earth tones" trend done in the late 90's/2000's, inspired by Whole Foods or Wild Oats. Albertsons did this with their "Blue & Green Awnings" decor.
Acme "Chalkboard Market":
Albertsons "Industrial Circus":
Jewel "Marketplace":
Albertsons "Wegmans Wannabe":
Safeway "Pre-Lifestyle":
Kroger "Fresh Fare":
Except for Safeway, I admit I was never local to said packages. They look a bit bland with their earth tones and cheesy elements, but I will admit - at least those invoked a warm, inviting feeling, an atmosphere interior designers do not seem to be considering at this time.
TW-Upstate NY wrote: September 12th, 2020, 8:47 am
Super S wrote: September 11th, 2020, 5:46 pm I would like to see the trend of polished concrete floors go away.
Thank you! And add to that open ceilings as well.
From what I've heard, concrete conversions that stores like Walmart and Target have been doing are in order to facilitate robotic floor cleaning. Add to how tile cleaning has generally been difficult, and you see the decline in linoleum flooring. It's a tad shame, as there is also terrazzo.
veteran+ wrote: September 13th, 2020, 6:53 am I love NEW polished concrete floors or slightly distressed (not dirty looking with huge scars) coupled with exposed ceilings (but darker colored).

I do not always think that works for upper scale large department stores.

The Rockn Roll Ralphs on Sunset Bl. has the ugliest concrete floors I have seen. They really look dirty even when clean.

I think (at least in SoCal) supermarket architecture has become so banal and uninspiring.
Agreed. It is pretty out of place at Target. I'm not sure if it is still going nationwide outside of new stores.

One style I think has aged poorly is Walmart's brown concrete. It hasn't really matched packages since Project Impact I believe. It certainly looked nice back in the day.

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