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Target Dance Music

Posted: June 8th, 2019, 1:36 am
by Alpha8472
I was at a Target store that is undergoing the Next Gen Remodel and it sounded like I was in a dance club. The thumping dance music was almost as bad as Abercrombie & Fitch or its teenage cousin Hollister.

If they start pumping cologne into the air, I will avoid this place like the plague.

Re: Target Dance Music

Posted: June 8th, 2019, 7:13 am
by Super S
Alpha8472 wrote:
June 8th, 2019, 1:36 am
I was at a Target store that is undergoing the Next Gen Remodel and it sounded like I was in a dance club. The thumping dance music was almost as bad as Abercrombie & Fitch or its teenage cousin Hollister.

If they start pumping cologne into the air, I will avoid this place like the plague.
Target had a no-music policy in place for many years, and went to great lengths to discourage use of the P.A. system. While some may argue that it provides a more peaceful experience, shopping in a Target on a slow day almost is creepy when the store is so quiet.

Music is tolerable as long as the volume is not obnoxious.

On a related note, Fred Meyer often has LOUD advertisements for products sprinkled in with their music. The music is ok, but these advertisements, combined with some of the canned announcements (which have been discussed elsewhere on here) make me want to get in and out of the store quickly. I think if Target sticks to music that isn't overly obnoxious, they will be fine.

Re: Target Dance Music

Posted: June 8th, 2019, 1:44 pm
by BatteryMill
Alpha8472 wrote:
June 8th, 2019, 1:36 am
I was at a Target store that is undergoing the Next Gen Remodel and it sounded like I was in a dance club. The thumping dance music was almost as bad as Abercrombie & Fitch or its teenage cousin Hollister.

If they start pumping cologne into the air, I will avoid this place like the plague.
Well, that's Cornell-era Target for you. They're certainly trying to present themselves to that crowd with these remodels, small-format stores in urban locales, and their general image on top of the music selection. The music does fit modern Target well, but it would be jarring elsewhere. The amount of changes and rule-breaking they've made sure would be jarring to anyone who hasn't been shopping there since, say, 2013.

I'm not a fan of these changes either - some seem like they're just copying off general retail trends and detract from the classic purpose of Target. I will, however commend they're making their stores great environments to keep brick & mortar going.

Re: Target Dance Music

Posted: June 9th, 2019, 7:27 pm
by babs
BatteryMill wrote:
June 8th, 2019, 1:44 pm
Alpha8472 wrote:
June 8th, 2019, 1:36 am
I was at a Target store that is undergoing the Next Gen Remodel and it sounded like I was in a dance club. The thumping dance music was almost as bad as Abercrombie & Fitch or its teenage cousin Hollister.

If they start pumping cologne into the air, I will avoid this place like the plague.
Well, that's Cornell-era Target for you. They're certainly trying to present themselves to that crowd with these remodels, small-format stores in urban locales, and their general image on top of the music selection. The music does fit modern Target well, but it would be jarring elsewhere. The amount of changes and rule-breaking they've made sure would be jarring to anyone who hasn't been shopping there since, say, 2013.

I'm not a fan of these changes either - some seem like they're just copying off general retail trends and detract from the classic purpose of Target. I will, however commend they're making their stores great environments to keep brick & mortar going.
You may not like where Cornell is taking Target but they are one of the few retailers showing comp growth. Give Cornell credit for righting the ship.

And most importantly, my wife has returned to shopping at Target. She stopped shopping there after the store pulled out so much merchandise to make room for expanded grocery. She said that Target lost it's edge after that and there was little reason to go there since they carried what everyone else had. Now she says that treasure hunt aspect has returned.

I kinda like the music but I can also see people hating it as well.

Re: Target Dance Music

Posted: June 9th, 2019, 8:41 pm
by arizonaguy
babs wrote:
June 9th, 2019, 7:27 pm
BatteryMill wrote:
June 8th, 2019, 1:44 pm
Alpha8472 wrote:
June 8th, 2019, 1:36 am
I was at a Target store that is undergoing the Next Gen Remodel and it sounded like I was in a dance club. The thumping dance music was almost as bad as Abercrombie & Fitch or its teenage cousin Hollister.

If they start pumping cologne into the air, I will avoid this place like the plague.
Well, that's Cornell-era Target for you. They're certainly trying to present themselves to that crowd with these remodels, small-format stores in urban locales, and their general image on top of the music selection. The music does fit modern Target well, but it would be jarring elsewhere. The amount of changes and rule-breaking they've made sure would be jarring to anyone who hasn't been shopping there since, say, 2013.

I'm not a fan of these changes either - some seem like they're just copying off general retail trends and detract from the classic purpose of Target. I will, however commend they're making their stores great environments to keep brick & mortar going.
You may not like where Cornell is taking Target but they are one of the few retailers showing comp growth. Give Cornell credit for righting the ship.

And most importantly, my wife has returned to shopping at Target. She stopped shopping there after the store pulled out so much merchandise to make room for expanded grocery. She said that Target lost it's edge after that and there was little reason to go there since they carried what everyone else had. Now she says that treasure hunt aspect has returned.

I kinda like the music but I can also see people hating it as well.
I live about a block away from a SuperTarget so I shop there all the time. As of now, my store doesn't have any music.

I believe the future of physical retail is the "treasure hunt" as treasure hunting is much more difficult online (my online purchases tend to be things I need versus things I didn't know that I needed).

Re: Target Dance Music

Posted: June 9th, 2019, 9:31 pm
by rwsandiego
arizonaguy wrote:
June 9th, 2019, 8:41 pm
...I live about a block away from a SuperTarget so I shop there all the time. As of now, my store doesn't have any music.

I believe the future of physical retail is the "treasure hunt" as treasure hunting is much more difficult online (my online purchases tend to be things I need versus things I didn't know that I needed).
That treasure hunt is what made shopping at Target fun and for several years it hasn't been fun. I agree that the fun is coming back to Target.

I've been to three recently-remodeled Targets in the past few months: North Scottsdale (suburban Phoenix, for those who do not live here), Eagle Rock Plaza (LA), and Flagstaff AZ. One of the stores (North Scottsdale, I think) had music, but it was turned down very low. Still, it was noticeable, mainly because Target never has music nor does it use the PA. What I liked the most about the three stores is the home section was merchandised much like a Crate and Barrel. It was nice to have an actual display where I could look at the merchandise. Felt much more like a department store than a discount store. Of course, Target has its roots in department stores, so that makes sense.

Re: Target Dance Music

Posted: June 10th, 2019, 5:39 am
by veteran+
Here in San Diego they are doing a major remodel of their store at the Mission Valley Mall.

There is a MAJOR expansion for food but it feels the whole store is changing.

The store is quite large (2 stories) but it does not have the SuperTarget moniker (not sure how many square feet).

So far no music (wish they had some good dance music, but not too loud)

:-)

Re: Target Dance Music

Posted: June 10th, 2019, 6:54 am
by rwsandiego
veteran+ wrote:
June 10th, 2019, 5:39 am
Here in San Diego they are doing a major remodel of their store at the Mission Valley Mall.

There is a MAJOR expansion for food but it feels the whole store is changing.

The store is quite large (2 stories) but it does not have the SuperTarget moniker (not sure how many square feet).

So far no music (wish they had some good dance music, but not too loud)

:-)
That store was my local Target before moving to Phoenix, but I'd find myself driving over to Sports Arena more often than not. After Sports Arena was expanded and remodeled I liked that store better than MV. IMO, when they slammed in groceries implemented the P-Fresh program at MV they ruined the store.

Re: Target Dance Music

Posted: June 13th, 2019, 5:10 pm
by BatteryMill
babs wrote:
June 9th, 2019, 7:27 pm
You may not like where Cornell is taking Target but they are one of the few retailers showing comp growth. Give Cornell credit for righting the ship.

And most importantly, my wife has returned to shopping at Target. She stopped shopping there after the store pulled out so much merchandise to make room for expanded grocery. She said that Target lost it's edge after that and there was little reason to go there since they carried what everyone else had. Now she says that treasure hunt aspect has returned.

I kinda like the music but I can also see people hating it as well.
That's a reasonable argument for the new Target and their strategies in this tough time in retail. I care about areas that are important to their success, such as the remodel program and pickup options, I am not very concerned about those efforts. What I'm talking about is their less-important, but still prevalent changes in this era such as the lowercase logo, their departmental "innovation" remodels (which, while look good on their own clash with classic Target design), and elements of their remodel packages that look uninspired or create an endless sea of gray.

Also, how exactly did Target shrink departments in the PFresh era? I never really experienced the changes first-hand as my local stores were a) a 1990s store that closed without said remodel, and b) a SuperTarget which had no adjustments made at that time. With that I'm also curious as to if any Supers have always had more merchandise than smaller stores or can still be feasible now.

Re: Target Dance Music

Posted: June 16th, 2019, 4:58 am
by mjhale
Target's recent remodels (ie the Sterling , VA store off Route 7) look like an ode to what they think millennial shoppers want in a store. No problem with them catering to a certain demographic. However as a store they have to consider that folks might come in and go what the heck happened in here I don't feel comfortable anymore and not come back. Target's previous store designs were enough in your face to make you remember them but still comfortable enough for someone who wants a more "tame" shopping experience. Now the remodels just seem in your face for no particular reason. I'm far from a millennial so maybe I just don't get it. However if a store wants to seem like they are catering to a certain demographic I'll shop elsewhere and so will others who don't like the new look. That doesn't seem like a good plan for a mass merchandiser. Better to try to be neutral for all instead of in your face for some.