An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

SamSpade
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An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by SamSpade »

Shopping in Murray, Utah at Fashion Place Mall under the shadow of COVID-19
https://www.motherjones.com/politics/20 ... l-in-utah/
storewanderer
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Re: An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by storewanderer »

That is pretty much how the mall in Reno was yesterday... but no "packed" parking lot by any means and based on the photos of the UT mall I don't think that parking lot was "packed" either. A "packed" mall is one where there are so many people around you that you can't see around you. It isn't like that in the photos, not even 20% of the way there. Someone from DC should certainly know what "packed" is as stuff in DC is often "packed" due to density (subways, small supermarkets in the city, small Starbucks locations, etc.).

Almost nobody wears masks, nobody social distances, there are many groups of more than 10 (half kids), lots of close contact, talking, touching, etc.

From what I am hearing the mall is getting busier and busier every day as more and more stores open up. They are not even close to last year's level of business but it is not like nobody is coming despite people like the writer of this article who seem to be scared yet went anyway then just complained about the behaviors of others and the decisions of political officials of the area in which the mall is located.

I would suggest if this DC person is not comfortable in such a setting they should just stay home. They knew what they were getting into going to Utah, finding that one open mall closest to the center of Salt Lake City that was outside the city in Murray, and it appears as if they were just looking for things to complain about when they set out to Utah in the first place.

Others around the US, specifically in less densely populated areas such as Utah and much of the middle of the US, have, as she says, declared the pandemic over based on their behaviors (even when case counts in those very regions say otherwise). Governors from both political parties have lifted stay at home orders even as cases rise; here in NV our Democrat Governor just allowed summer school to open up after schools have been closed yet cases here keep rising every day. Sorry, but it is no longer political at this point, it is economics. Despite cases rising the officials in NV are blaming the rising cases on a rising number of tests being done and that the rising number of cases do not mean reopening plans need to be modified... wow... okay... what were we doing the last 3 months then? Oh well.

This cavalier attitude is something we are going to need to come to terms with. To put it bluntly: majority rules. That doesn't mean the majority is right, though. If the author doesn't like what the people in Utah are doing, she should not go there.

If Utah has some big outbreak due to this, and thousands more people die, then she can go around (proudly?) saying "I was right and all the politicians and people in Utah were wrong."
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Re: An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by klkla »

Utah is one of the 14 states that since the beginning of the month has recorded their highest-ever seven-day average of new coronavirus cases since the pandemic began. Washington D.C. has flattened the curve.
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Re: An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by storewanderer »

klkla wrote: June 11th, 2020, 5:35 pm Utah is one of the 14 states that since the beginning of the month has recorded their highest-ever seven-day average of new coronavirus cases since the pandemic began. Washington D.C. has flattened the curve.
In which case why does someone leave DC and go to Utah and then go out to a crowded mall in Utah? Then write an article complaining about the behavior and the people in Utah and how they are not being mindful of the situation.

I understand going to Utah to visit family (though there is that risk she is bringing the virus from DC a previous epicenter to Utah) but to go to a crowded mall while there? Then write an article based on the mall experience slamming the people and politicians in Utah?

Frankly if after about 2 minutes of walking into the mall she was uncomfortable with how many people were there or how few had masks on she should have left... I have walked from multiple places I am not comfortable with during this pandemic for one reason or another (mainly people coughing heavily, or poor cleanlines/sanitation)... have stopped any travel on airplanes simply due to personal comfort level (even though it is probably very safe with the less full planes, quality filtration systems, better nightly deep cleanings, and with masks used)... it is all what a person is comfortable with.
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Re: An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by veteran+ »

storewanderer wrote: June 11th, 2020, 8:52 pm
klkla wrote: June 11th, 2020, 5:35 pm Utah is one of the 14 states that since the beginning of the month has recorded their highest-ever seven-day average of new coronavirus cases since the pandemic began. Washington D.C. has flattened the curve.
In which case why does someone leave DC and go to Utah and then go out to a crowded mall in Utah? Then write an article complaining about the behavior and the people in Utah and how they are not being mindful of the situation.

I understand going to Utah to visit family (though there is that risk she is bringing the virus from DC a previous epicenter to Utah) but to go to a crowded mall while there? Then write an article based on the mall experience slamming the people and politicians in Utah?

Frankly if after about 2 minutes of walking into the mall she was uncomfortable with how many people were there or how few had masks on she should have left... I have walked from multiple places I am not comfortable with during this pandemic for one reason or another (mainly people coughing heavily, or poor cleanlines/sanitation)... have stopped any travel on airplanes simply due to personal comfort level (even though it is probably very safe with the less full planes, quality filtration systems, better nightly deep cleanings, and with masks used)... it is all what a person is comfortable with.
Well, we are ALL guilty of editorial abuse and or embellishment.

I did not sense any slamming.

Perhaps you suspected a subtext of East coast vs West coast?
Alpha8472
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Re: An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by Alpha8472 »

Many areas no longer call it shelter in place. It is now mitigation in place. They want people who are medically vulnerable to stay at home such as the elderly. Other people should put on masks and get back to work.

The disturbing part is not stores being open, but the lack of masks. If everyone wore masks, you could shop and go about your business. However, those without masks could be spreading coronavirus to other people.

In California, most counties in the most populated areas of the San Francisco Bay Area require masks in public and in stores. People often ignore the 6 foot rule, but masks keep it under control for the most part.

I went to Tracy, California which is just outside the San Francisco Bay Area and people were not wearing masks. This made it uncomfortable to be near people. I would rather have everyone wear masks and have the stores reopened. The people who do not wear masks show no regard for the safety and health of others.

Other countries have mask requirements for everyone such as Taiwan. They only had 7 deaths out of over 23 million people. Coronavirus can be kept under control, but only with everyone cooperating to limit the spread. Taiwan does not have a lock down and their economy is not in trouble.
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Re: An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by cjd »

I agree on the masks. I wear one when I go out but I am concerned about how many people don't wear them. Hopefully if anyone there has it, by keeping distance I should be ok. I don't worry about it in a store since I try to keep my distance and am generally moving around so I won't be around the same person or area anyway. But sometimes it's not possible to keep a 6 foot distance in tight aisles, etc, and other times people seem to get near me as if nothing is going on.

Of course the safest thing would be to stay home but after two months of that other than work I had really had enough. Personally I'm really glad things have reopened, I just wish people would be more careful so we could get this mess contained and get back to normalcy sooner. I know it basically will have to run its course which could take a few years based on other pandemics, but it would be a lot fewer deaths I think if people would just stop acting as if nothing is wrong.
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Re: An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by storewanderer »

A couple weeks ago when the local Simon mall opened, it was entry restricted (most entrances were closed directly into the mall) and if you entered through that open Simon Mall entry they provided a mask to all customers. But if you entered through Macys (which had all 4 of its exterior doors open between its two spaces), no masks were provided so it was a mix but many people had masks on within the mall that time, probably 75%. This past week they have stopped actively providing masks to all customers and opened more of the Simon Mall entrances (masks may be available upon request somewhere in the mall but if so I couldn't say where) but like 2 of the 100+ stores in the mall are requiring masks for entry (Sunglass Hut and some clothing place I forget). In the mall maybe 25% of customers have masks on this past week. Saw many kids with masks too (even saw one kid in a stroller with a mask on... really wanted to say something... but didn't)- it is basically with groups an "all masked or no masks" deal.

Up here around Reno/Tahoe fewer and fewer people are wearing masks anywhere, including store employees. It was very uncomfortable to wear a mask during 90 degree weather but it has been cooler the past few days.

There are also rural counties in CA requiring masks in public places: Inyo, Mono, and Plumas County. Very few cases. Plumas County has only had 4 cases. But Lassen County (next to Plumas County) has only 8 cases and no mask requirement. These counties are so unpopulated and the stores there rarely have any crowds (it is busy if more than three cash registers are open at once).

Bottom line is stay away from people and if uncomfortable, get out of the place. I'm just as nervous if someone in a mask is coughing and sneezing as someone without a mask and act accordingly. But I would assume the masked person is projecting less germs in the cough or sneeze. But really, bottom line is to just stay away.

Also off topic but am continuing to see people use public restrooms and not wash their hands. I cannot believe it. Even after all this...
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Re: An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by TW-Upstate NY »

cjd wrote: June 13th, 2020, 7:17 pm But sometimes it's not possible to keep a 6 foot distance in tight aisles, etc, and other times people seem to get near me as if nothing is going on.
And that's bad enough but then you have people who are totally oblivious to the concept of one-way aisles. You'll be headed in the proper direction when all of a sudden someone is coming towards you. Tell me, do you drive the wrong way down one-way streets too?!? Then you have people that "linger" in aisles looking at (and touching) every product on the shelf. And it's usually items I want to buy. The other week, somebody did that with a product of which there was only one size and variety in the store! They made it a point to touch just about every bottle of the stuff. When that happens, I'll just stand behind them and wait. Then they'll just turn around and stare at you as if to say: "what's your problem?" Here's how you have to approach shopping these days-do your homework in advance, know which aisles products are in and the most important thing of all (aside from wearing a mask and maintaining social distancing)-GET IN AND GET OUT!
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Re: An Experience: DC mom gives her first-hand account of Utah

Post by storewanderer »

TW-Upstate NY wrote: June 14th, 2020, 8:55 am
And that's bad enough but then you have people who are totally oblivious to the concept of one-way aisles. You'll be headed in the proper direction when all of a sudden someone is coming towards you. Tell me, do you drive the wrong way down one-way streets too?!? Then you have people that "linger" in aisles looking at (and touching) every product on the shelf. And it's usually items I want to buy. The other week, somebody did that with a product of which there was only one size and variety in the store! They made it a point to touch just about every bottle of the stuff. When that happens, I'll just stand behind them and wait. Then they'll just turn around and stare at you as if to say: "what's your problem?" Here's how you have to approach shopping these days-do your homework in advance, know which aisles products are in and the most important thing of all (aside from wearing a mask and maintaining social distancing)-GET IN AND GET OUT!
If you don't need the item right away I suggest quarantining the item for a few days in your yard/patio or garage before bringing it in. No telling who has touched this stuff or sneezed/coughed on it. I shop late at night usually; no telling what happened in the previous 12 hours.
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